Technology Process Lessons for Level 3 Students Report (Assessment)

Technology Process Lessons for Level 3 Students Report (Assessment)

Outline of Lessons

Who

This curriculum targets level 3 students who need to embrace the aspects of technology through the establishment and ratification of technological processes (investigating, devising, producing, and evaluating) (Willard, 2007). Students should know how to investigate issues, values, demands, and opportunities individually. Additionally, they should be able to devise and generate viable ideologies meant to prepare production proposals. They should also be able to emerge with solutions and manage production processes. This is followed by the ability to evaluate intentions, plans, and actions during the entire technological processes (Frumkin, 2006).

What

Fundamentally, the syllabus seeks to ensure that students understand the underlying concepts regarding technology processes (investigating, devising, producing, and evaluating). Students should have an outline of lessons covering each of the mentioned steps (Frumkin, 2006). As such, they should look into ways to reduce the impacts of such technologies on their lives and the environment. The measures undertaken should ensure that technology still meets the relevant human needs (Diamond, 2009).

How

Teaching this syllabus will encompass several strategies. Initially, the teachers should begin by elaborating to learners the magnitude of the lessons on any technological process. Students should be allowed to investigate their own issues for subsequent technological processes (Paterson, 2010). This is a critical phenomenon in various contexts. Subsequently, the tutor should engage the class in discussions relating to the topic. Once the discussion is complete, the tutor should allow students to brainstorm the ideas learned, device, and evaluate their progress (Hawkins & Simmons, 2009).

Lesson Summaries

Lesson Curriculum Links Lesson Aims Teaching Strategies and Activities
Lesson 1 Investigating
TP 3, TP 3.1,
Objective: Students should be able to complete technological phases step by step to help them generate critical ideas.
Students we have to examine the values and viewpoints of both the developer and user evident in technology. The students will be able to investigate issues, values, demands, as well as opportunities fronted by a given technological condition. For example, the lesson will help in investigating issues related to products they constantly use daily. Students will emerge with their own ideas on the matter. Teaching strategies and activities in this context will incorporate the posing of questions to students to help them brainstorm and investigate critically on opportunities. Additionally, students will be allowed to front their own ideas regarding the lesson (investigating).

Alternatively, the tutor may present diagrams and images relevant to the topic of interest. Consequently, it will be possible to investigate issues, technological problems, and other relevant provisions at free will. For example, students can list their preferred products while the tutor can ask the class to state their uses.

Lesson 2 Devising
TP 3, TP 3.2
Objectives; After the lesson, students should be able to select and safely use technological aspects and equipment. Additionally, they should be observing aesthetic, functional, and environmental prerequisites regarding personal designs.
Students should be able to generate designs that consider social as well as environmental values relevant to the designs. Additionally, they should be able to communicate using varying accurate graphical representations, models, and technical terms. Students will be able to formulate solutions to the problems identified in the first lesson.

It is from the previously identified problems that the entire solutions in this lesson emerge. Critically, it is crucial to understand various provisions in the context of technology and other relevant aspects. Precisely, the student will devise and generate ideologies related to the investigated problems. Consequently, they will be able to prepare production proposals required in this context.

The tutor should prepare students by first reminding them of the investigated issues and the need to formulate solutions for such investigated issues. It is from this context that the required solutions emerge. It is true that students have realized the looming opportunities concerning technology. Subsequently, the tutor will engage students in generating viable ideologies regarding the matter.
Lesson 3 Producing
TP 3, TP 3.3
Objective: Students should be able to plan and execute steps of production processes. They should also be able to make safe
and proficient use of
resources
Students will be able to organize and implement personal production processes. Able to work within given constraints and recognize hazards while adopting safe work practices. In this context, students are expected to emerge with solutions and manage production processes. ‘Producing’ can refer either to making an individual model or to the eventual large-scale invention of the absolute product.

In either case, a sequence of processes is utilized to make the component parts then amass them into a whole. It is crucial to understand that the entire investigation process emerged with a problem to be solved.

The devising process (lesson 2) emerged with critical ideologies meant to curb the investigated problems. Consequently, the aim of this lesson is to produce the desired product that will solve the identified problems.

In this lesson, one of the teaching strategies is to allow the student to participate in the production processes so as to have a firsthand glimpse of the entire lesson.

Concurrently, students will be allowed to undertake simple production processes, using trial-and-error methodologies. This will keep them engaged in the entire lesson. Nonetheless, they have to observe care and safety. Another teaching strategy is to scheme production processes, make product systems, enhance processes, and use resources safely while protecting the environment.

Lesson 4 Evaluating
TP 3, TP 3.4
Objective; at the end of the lesson, students will be able to evaluate the entire aspects of the curriculum.
At the end of the lesson, students will be able to evaluate how well the ideas, products, systems, processes, services, and environments utilized conform to design requirements, including consideration of societal and ecological impacts. In this lesson, learners assess intentions, plans, and actions taken for the investigated issues.

Evaluating will give feedback on how successful the former three steps have been. Additionally, the lesson will unveil whether the original intentions have been accomplished or whether additional work is required.

In this lesson, the teaching strategies incorporate allowing students to express their own feelings about the processes and products attained. Another evaluation strategy is to express feelings about individual ideas, products, and processes. Another strategy is to compare resultant products, systems, processes, services, and environments with the previously set intentions

Assessment Rubric

Lesson 1-Investigating

This is a crucial section of the curriculum. It enables the tutor to assess the creativity and understanding of students concerning technological processes (Levis & Stevens, 2005). Nonetheless, the rubrics should be friendly to the students and help the tutor. The section evaluates whether level 3 students understand and apply the relationship between aesthetics, societal, and environmental effects when generating and communicating designs. Similarly, this should be applicable when formulating and transforming technologies. It uses functional aesthetic criteria (McGowan, 2004). The rubrics entail;

Fail Pass Credit Distinction Higher distinction
The student does not understand the concepts of the lesson and unable to investigate issues, values, demands, and opportunities. Additionally, there is a demonstration that demonstrates of vague understanding of the concepts and objectives of the lesson. Concurrently, a student unable to evaluate the intentions, plans, and objectives of the curriculum. He/she does not understand the concepts and objectives of the lesson. No proper understanding of the concepts of the lesson but fails to vividly investigate issues, values, demands, and opportunities. Also, the student is able to indicate, suggest, and describe his or her ideologies either verbally or by gestures. He or she participates in production processes but indicates limited understanding and execution of the lesson’s demands. Students can investigate the form and identifies the uses of daily products. He or she generates ideas for their own designs, using trial-and-error, simple models, and drawings. Student executes simple production processes, utilizing trial-and-error methodologies. Additionally, the student is able to express his or her own feelings regarding their own design, ideas, products, and the used processes Students able to investigate and identify the purposes and effects of products, systems, processes as well as services. Student investigates issues, values, demands, and opportunities. The student devises relevant designs, recognizes practical constraints using text, drawings, or models, and introduces related technical terms. Student schemes production processes. Additionally, he/she safely utilize resources in order to make products, systems, processes, services, and viable environments. There is the ability to examine and identify key design features. The student demonstrates a vivid understanding of the lesson’s concepts and provides elaborated investigations on issues, values, demands, and opportunities. Additionally, the student is able to communicate utilizing various graphical representations, designs, and technical terms. Able to demonstrate how well the ideas, products, systems, processes, services, and environments utilized accomplish the design requirements and intentions of the lesson.

References

Diamond, R. (2008). Designing and Assessing Courses and Curricula: A Practical Guide. San Francisco, CA: Wiley and Sons Publisher.

Frumkin, H. (2006). Safe And Healthy School Environments. United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.

Hawkins, C. & Simmons, C. (2009). Teaching Ict . London: Sage Publications.

Levis, A. & Stevens, D. (2005). Introduction to Rubrics. Virginia, VA: Stylus Publshing.

McGowan, K. (2004). Rubric. Columbus, OH: Pudding House Publishing.

Paterson, K. (2010). Teaching in Troubled Times. Ontario, Canada: Pembroke Publishers.

Willard, N. (2007). Cyber-Safe Kids, Cyber-Savvy Teens: Helping Young People Learn To Use the. San Francisco, CA: Wiley and Sons Publisher.

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