Should Steroids be Allowed in High School Sports

Should Steroids be Allowed in High School Sports?

Should schools and sports districts for varsity and JV sports allow steroids? “Doping” by professional athletes has been acknowledged as a problem since the 1960s. Doping is steroid use. Estimates based on data from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, it indicated that there are more than 1 million current or former AAS users in this country, population being 26 years of age or older. More than 300,000 individuals used AAS in the past year. Males had higher levels of AAS use during their lifetime than females (0.9% and 0.1%, respectively). The median age of first use of AAS for the study population was 18 years; for 12- to 17-year-olds. The median age of initiation was 15 years. Among 12- to 34-year-olds, AAS use was significantly and positively associated with the use of other illicit drugs, cigarettes (12- to 17-year-olds only) and alcohol. Furthermore, AAS use is highly correlated with self-reported aggressive behavior and crimes against property. The survey covered the population aged 12 years and older living in households in the United States. The results of the survey were based on personal interviews combined with self-administered questionnaires from 32,594 respondents. These respondents were randomly selected by means of a stratified multistage area sample of the household population.

Should Schools allow steroid use in sports? Those who oppose the use of steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs say, the athletes who use them are breaking the rules and getting an unfair advantage over others. Opponents of the drugs say the athletes are endangering not only their own health, but also indirectly encouraging youngsters to do the same. Six experts on steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs recently took on the issue in an Oxford-style debate, part of the series?Intelligence Squared U.S.?The debates are modeled on a program begun in London in 2002: Three experts argue in favor of a proposition and three argue against. Others maintain that it is hypocritical for society to encourage consumers to seek drugs to treat all sorts of ailments and conditions but to disdain drug use for sports. They say the risk to athletes has been overstated and that the effort to keep them from using performance-enhancing drugs is bound to fail.

“Doping” by professional athletes has been acknowledged as a problem since at least the 1960s. doping is steroid use. Human growth hormone (HGH) is taken for improved endurance and strength. Androstenedione is a supplement that was sold over-the-counter until the FDA acted in 2004. It is banned by the NFL, Olympics, NCAA and MLB. The supplement is an anabolic steroid precursor, meaning that the body converts it into testosterone. Anabolic steroids are natural and synthetic substances which help build muscle mass, enabling athletes to train harder and recover quickly from strenuous workouts. Diuretics are banned because they can be abused to mask other drugs in urine tests, and they are also taken to achieve rapid weight loss.

Estimates based on data from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse indicated that there are more than 1 million current or former AAS users in this country, with more than half of the lifetime user population being 26 years of age or older. More than 300,000 individuals used AAS in the past year. Males had higher levels of AAS use during their lifetime than females (0.9% and 0.1%, respectively) The median age of first use of AAS for the study population was 18 years; for 12- to 17-year-olds, the median age of initiation was 15 years. Among 12- to 34-year-olds, AAS use was significantly and positively associated with the use of other illicit drugs, cigarettes (12- to 17-year-olds only) and alcohol. Furthermore, AAS use is highly correlated with self-reported aggressive behavior and crimes against property. To excel in athletic competition is admirable. Most high school, college, amateur and professional athletes participate in sports for the opportunity to pit their abilities against those of their peers. Development of cholesterol patterns associated with coronary heart disease, obstructed blood vessels, or stroke. Some symptoms are Increased cholesterol and Increased blood pressure. Stunted growth, caused by premature closing of cartilage-like growth plates in adolescents. The survey covered the population aged 12 years and older living in households in the United States. The results of the survey were based on personal interviews combined with self-administered questionnaires from 32,594 respondents. These respondents were randomly selected by means of a stratified multistage area sample of the household population.

In Conclusion, should schools and sports districts for varsity and JV sports allow steroids? “Doping” by professional athletes has been acknowledged as a problem since the 1960s. Doping is steroid use. Estimates based on data from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, it indicated that there are more than 1 million current or former AAS users in this country, population being 26 years of age or older. More than 300,000 individuals used AAS in the past year. Males had higher levels of AAS use during their lifetime than females (0.9% and 0.1%, respectively). The median age of first use of AAS for the study population was 18 years; for 12- to 17-year-olds. The median age of initiation was 15 years. Among 12- to 34-year-olds, AAS use was significantly and positively associated with the use of other illicit drugs, cigarettes (12- to 17-year-olds only) and alcohol. Furthermore, AAS use is highly correlated with self-reported aggressive behavior and crimes against property. The survey covered the population aged 12 years and older living in households in the United States. The results of the survey were based on personal interviews combined with self-administered questionnaires from 32,594 respondents. These respondents were randomly selected by means of a stratified multistage area sample of the household population.

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